Contact Us

City of Bridgeport
809 Main St.
Bridgeport, NE 69336
Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30 AM - 4:30 PM

Phone: 308-262-1623

The City of Bridgeport is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

recovery.nebraska.gov RECOVERY.gov

Drinking water is one of our most precious resources and it is the responsibility of everyone to protect this vital commodity. There are many ways that our drinking water become polluted, and the most well known of these are caused by large chemical companies and industries that discard hazardous materials in an unsafe manner. Although these are the most advertised methods of polluting groundwater, the most numerous and avoidable sources of contamination are the result of cross connections.

 What are cross connections?

A cross connection occurs whenever there is a physical connection between sources of contamination and the public drinking water supply. Sources of contamination can include hazardous as well as non hazardous materials. Raw sewage and corrosion control chemicals used in boilers are examples of hazardous materials, while milk, orange juice and other edible substances are examples of non-hazardous materials. Every house contains several cross connections. Sinks, bathtubs and toilets contain a physical connection between the sewer system and the water system, but current plumbing codes and standards require these devices to be protected by built in air gaps. Some older houses may still have the old washtub sinks and claw footed bathtubs where the faucets are below the overflow level of the fixture, and these are considered an unprotected cross connection. For the purpose of protecting the public water supply, it is the unprotected cross connections that we must address.

 What causes cross connections?

Cross connections occur whenever water is needed for a specific purpose in the home. Unprotected cross connections are usually caused when the equipment for these purposes are improperly installed. Some cross connections are permanent while others are temporary. Examples of permanent cross connections are the fill line for a boiler used to heat a home, for swamp coolers and for water softeners and other home water treatment systems. These are usually piped right into the water system in the house and often there is no protection included in the installation. The drain line for water softeners are often plumbed directly into the sewer line of the home, which could result in raw sewage being siphoned back into the water pipes. Built in swimming pools, hot tubs, saunas, etc. are also examples of permanent type cross connections. Underground lawn sprinkler systems are a special case in Nebraska, but care should be taken to insure they do not contaminate the water. The vast majority of temporary cross connections occur when hoses are connected to a faucet. Although the garden hose is the most common example of this type of cross connection, attaching hoses to sink faucets should not be overlooked. A sink sprayer that slips over the faucet is fairly common, and hoses used to fill and empty water beds also constitute a cross connection. Garden hoses are the most common unprotected cross connections. Washing a car, filling a baby pool, irrigating a garden and spraying pesticides and fertilizer using a garden hose are several situations where a garden hose might end up submerged in a hazardous material. Although many lawn sprinklers are designed to have an air gap built in, soaker hoses and some low-profile sprinklers can end up submerged in water when used. Water toys, such as a slip-and-slide may also be a potential source of contamination.

 Can cross connections affect me?

The affects of a backflow incident resulting from an unprotected cross connection can range from an upset stomach to serious illness or even death. It is suspected that many instances of “the flu that is going around” are in actuality the result of a backflow incident occurring due to a reduced or lost pressure incident in the water system. Many water systems are starting to use a containment method to protect the system from contamination. This system consists of placing a backflow preventer on the service line prior to any water connection. Thereby keeping any contaminant on the premise from being able to get into the public water system. Although this method protects the public water system, it does not protect the residents of the service from getting a serious illness from a backflow incident on the premises. It is therefore very important for your family that you check your household plumbing to insure that there is no possibility of getting contamination from your house into the water your family drinks.

How can I protect my family from cross connections?

1. Check your water softener or other in -home treatment device to insure that any drain lines have a proper air gap prior to entering the sewer line. The floor drain is considered a sewer line and there should be an air gap if the drain line runs into the floor drain.

2. Check all faucets where a hose might be connected and install a hose bib vacuum breaker to protect these connections.

3. Install a Pressure Vacuum Breaker on your underground sprinklers and have it tested annually when the sprinklers are turned on for the season.

4. If you have a boiler for home heating, make sure the fill line is protected with an approved backflow prevention assembly.

5. If you have old-style sinks or bathtubs, be sure never to fill them so the water level is higher than the fill spout.

 

City Of Bridgeport

 

Annual Water Quality Report

For January 1 to December 31, 2010

 This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the City Of Bridgeport water system to provide safe drinking water.

 Para Clientes Que Hablan Español:

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre el agua que usted bebe.  Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

 For more information regarding this report, contact:

 Wayne E Kautz

308-262-1623

 If you would like to observe the decision-making processes that affect drinking water quality, please attend the regularly scheduled meeting of the Village Board/City Council.  If you would like to participate in the process, please contact the Village/City Clerk to arrange to be placed on the agenda of the meeting of the Village Board/City Council.

 Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 Source Water Assessment Availability:

The Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) has completed the Source Water Assessment.  Included in the assessment is a Wellhead Protection Area map, potential contaminant source inventory, vulnerability rating, and source water protection information. To view the Source Water Assessment or for more information please contact the person named on the cover of this report or NDEQ at (402) 471-6988.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

 Sources of Drinking Water:

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and groundwater wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 The source of water used by City Of Bridgeport is ground water. 

 Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

*  Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.

*  Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

*  Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.

*  Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.

*  Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

 Drinking Water Health Notes:

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population.  It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home's plumbing.  If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home's water, you may wish to have your water tested. Flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using your tap water will clear the line of any lead that may have leached into the water while the line was idle.  Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) or the Department of Health and Human Services/Division of Public Health/Office of Drinking Water (402-471-2541).

 The City Of Bridgeport is required to test for the following contaminants:  Coliform Bacteria, Antimony, Arsenic, Asbestos, Barium, Beryllium, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Cyanide, Fluoride, Lead, Mercury, Nickel, Nitrate, Nitrite, Selenium, Sodium, Thallium, Alachlor, Atrazine, Benzo(a)pyrene, Carbofuran, Chlordane, Dalapon, Di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate, Dibromochloropropane, Dinoseb, Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, Diquat, 2,4-D, Endothall, Endrin, Ethylene dibromide, Glyphosate, Heptachlor, Heptachlor, epoxide, Hexachlorobenzene, Hexachlorocyclopentadiene, Lindane, Methoxychlor, Oxamyl (Vydate), Pentachlorophenol, Picloram, Polychlorinated biphenyls, Simazine, Toxaphene, Dioxin, Silvex, Benzene, Carbon Tetrachloride, o-Dichlorobenzene, Para-Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-Dichlorethane, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, Cis-1,2,-Dichloroethylene, Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Dichloromethane, 1,2-Dichloropropane, Ethylbenzene, Monochlorobenzene, 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene, 1,1,1-Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-Trichloroethane, Trichloroethylene, Vinyl Chloride, Styrene, Tetrachloroethylene, Toluene, Xylenes (total), Gross Alpha (minus Uranium & Radium 226), Radium 226 plus Radium 228, Sulfate, Chloroform, Bromodichloromethane, Chlorodibromomethane, Bromoform, Chlorobenzene, m-Dichlorobenzene, 1,1-Dichloropropene, 1,1-Dichloroethane, 1,1,2,2-Tetrachlorethane, 1,2-Dichloropropane, Chloromethane, Bromomethane, 1,2,3-Trichloropropane, 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane, Chloroethane, 2,2-Dichloropropane, o-Chlorotoluene, p-Chlorotoluene, Bromobenzene, 1,3-Dichloropropene, Aldrin, Butachlor, Carbaryl, Dicamba, Dieldrin, 3-Hydroxycarbofuran, Methomyl, Metolachlor, Metribuzin, Propachlor.

 Note:  The state requires monitoring of certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Therefore, some of this data may be more than one year old.

MCL (Maximum Contaminant Level):  The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.   MCLG (Maximum Contaminant Level Goal):  The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.  AL (Action Level):  The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

ppm:  parts per million            ppb:  parts per billion           

ppt:  parts per trillion               pCi/l:  picoCuries per liter    

ug/l:  micrograms per liter       (Measurement of Radioactivity)

City Of Bridgeport                                                                                                     TEST RESULTS                               Date Printed: 1/14/2013                                                                                                                               NE3112303

 

Microbiological

Highest No. of Positive Samples

MCL 

MCLG

Likely Source Of Contamination

Violations Present

 COLIFORM (TCR)

 In the month of October, 2 sample(s) were positive

 MCL: Systems that Collect Less Than 40 Samples per Month - No more than 1 positive monthly sample

 0

 Naturally present in the environment

 Yes

 E. COLI

 In the month of October, 1 sample(s) were positive

 MCL: A Routine Sample and a Repeat Sample are Total Coliform Positive, and One is also E. Coli Positive

 0

 Human and animal fecal waste

 Yes

 

Lead and Copper 

Monitoring Period

90th Percentile

Range

Unit

AL 

Sites Over AL

Likely Source Of Contamination

COPPER, FREE

2010

0.176

0.00682 - 0.553

ppm

1.3

0

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing.

 

 

 

Radiological Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Value

Range

Unit

MCL 

MCLG

Likely Source Of Contamination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 COMBINED URANIUM

 10/12/2010

 80

 5.3 - 80

 µg/l

 20

 0

 Erosion of natural deposits

 GROSS ALPHA, INCL. RADON & U

 09/23/2010

 10.8

 8.4 - 10.8

 pCi/l

 15

 0

 Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

During the 2010 calendar year, we had the below noted violation(s) of drinking water regulations.

Type

Category

Analyte

Compliance Period

MCL,  AVERAGE

Maximum Contaminant Level Violation

COMBINED URANIUM

01/01/2010 - 03/31/2010

MCL (TCR), ACUTE

Maximum Contaminant Level Violation

COLIFORM (TCR)

10/01/2010 - 10/31/2010

MCL (TCR), MONTHLY

Maximum Contaminant Level Violation

COLIFORM (TCR)

10/01/2010 - 10/31/2010

 

The City Of Bridgeport has taken the following actions to return to compliance with the Nebraska Safe Drinking Water Act:

 The system was flushed and disinfected to solve the coliform and E. coli problem.

A water treatment facility is now online to help with the uranium issue.

Additional Required Health Effects Language:

Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other potentially harmful bacteria may be present.  Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.    

E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, some of the elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems.

 Some people who drink water containing uranium in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer and kidney toxicity.

 A copy of this CCR may be viewed at the City of Bridgeport offices – 809 Main Street.

City Of Bridgeport

 

Annual Water Quality Report

For January 1 to December 31, 2010

 

This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the City Of Bridgeport water system to provide safe drinking water.

 

Para Clientes Que Hablan Español:

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre el agua que usted bebe.  Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

 

For more information regarding this report, contact:

 

Wayne E Kautz

308-262-1623

 

If you would like to observe the decision-making processes that affect drinking water quality, please attend the regularly scheduled meeting of the Village Board/City Council.  If you would like to participate in the process, please contact the Village/City Clerk to arrange to be placed on the agenda of the meeting of the Village Board/City Council.

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

Source Water Assessment Availability:

The Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) has completed the Source Water Assessment.  Included in the assessment is a Wellhead Protection Area map, potential contaminant source inventory, vulnerability rating, and source water protection information. To view the Source Water Assessment or for more information please contact the person named on the cover of this report or NDEQ at (402) 471-6988.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

Sources of Drinking Water:

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and groundwater wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

The source of water used by City Of Bridgeport is ground water. 

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

*  Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.

*  Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

*  Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.

*  Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.

*  Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

 

Drinking Water Health Notes:

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population.  It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home's plumbing.  If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home's water, you may wish to have your water tested. Flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using your tap water will clear the line of any lead that may have leached into the water while the line was idle.  Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) or the Department of Health and Human Services/Division of Public Health/Office of Drinking Water (402-471-2541).

 

The City Of Bridgeport is required to test for the following contaminants:  Coliform Bacteria, Antimony, Arsenic, Asbestos, Barium, Beryllium, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Cyanide, Fluoride, Lead, Mercury, Nickel, Nitrate, Nitrite, Selenium, Sodium, Thallium, Alachlor, Atrazine, Benzo(a)pyrene, Carbofuran, Chlordane, Dalapon, Di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate, Dibromochloropropane, Dinoseb, Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, Diquat, 2,4-D, Endothall, Endrin, Ethylene dibromide, Glyphosate, Heptachlor, Heptachlor, epoxide, Hexachlorobenzene, Hexachlorocyclopentadiene, Lindane, Methoxychlor, Oxamyl (Vydate), Pentachlorophenol, Picloram, Polychlorinated biphenyls, Simazine, Toxaphene, Dioxin, Silvex, Benzene, Carbon Tetrachloride, o-Dichlorobenzene, Para-Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-Dichlorethane, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, Cis-1,2,-Dichloroethylene, Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Dichloromethane, 1,2-Dichloropropane, Ethylbenzene, Monochlorobenzene, 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene, 1,1,1-Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-Trichloroethane, Trichloroethylene, Vinyl Chloride, Styrene, Tetrachloroethylene, Toluene, Xylenes (total), Gross Alpha (minus Uranium & Radium 226), Radium 226 plus Radium 228, Sulfate, Chloroform, Bromodichloromethane, Chlorodibromomethane, Bromoform, Chlorobenzene, m-Dichlorobenzene, 1,1-Dichloropropene, 1,1-Dichloroethane, 1,1,2,2-Tetrachlorethane, 1,2-Dichloropropane, Chloromethane, Bromomethane, 1,2,3-Trichloropropane, 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane, Chloroethane, 2,2-Dichloropropane, o-Chlorotoluene, p-Chlorotoluene, Bromobenzene, 1,3-Dichloropropene, Aldrin, Butachlor, Carbaryl, Dicamba, Dieldrin, 3-Hydroxycarbofuran, Methomyl, Metolachlor, Metribuzin, Propachlor.

 

Note:  The state requires monitoring of certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Therefore, some of this data may be more than one year old.

MCL (Maximum Contaminant Level):  The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.   MCLG (Maximum Contaminant Level Goal):  The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.  AL (Action Level):  The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

ppm:  parts per million            ppb:  parts per billion           

ppt:  parts per trillion               pCi/l:  picoCuries per liter    

ug/l:  micrograms per liter       (Measurement of Radioactivity)

 

City Of Bridgeport                                                                                                     TEST RESULTS                               Date Printed: 1/14/2013                                                                                                                               NE3112303

 

Microbiological

Highest No. of Positive Samples

MCL 

MCLG

Likely Source Of Contamination

Violations Present

 COLIFORM (TCR)

 In the month of October, 2 sample(s) were positive

 MCL: Systems that Collect Less Than 40 Samples per Month - No more than 1 positive monthly sample

 0

 Naturally present in the environment

 Yes

 E. COLI

 In the month of October, 1 sample(s) were positive

 MCL: A Routine Sample and a Repeat Sample are Total Coliform Positive, and One is also E. Coli Positive

 0

 Human and animal fecal waste

 Yes

 

Lead and Copper 

Monitoring Period

90th Percentile

Range

Unit

AL 

Sites Over AL

Likely Source Of Contamination

COPPER, FREE

2010

0.176

0.00682 - 0.553

ppm

1.3

0

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing.

 

 

 

Radiological Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Value

Range

Unit

MCL 

MCLG

Likely Source Of Contamination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 COMBINED URANIUM

 10/12/2010

 80

 5.3 - 80

 µg/l

 20

 0

 Erosion of natural deposits

 GROSS ALPHA, INCL. RADON & U

 09/23/2010

 10.8

 8.4 - 10.8

 pCi/l

 15

 0

 Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

During the 2010 calendar year, we had the below noted violation(s) of drinking water regulations.

Type

Category

Analyte

Compliance Period

MCL,  AVERAGE

Maximum Contaminant Level Violation

COMBINED URANIUM

01/01/2010 - 03/31/2010

MCL (TCR), ACUTE

Maximum Contaminant Level Violation

COLIFORM (TCR)

10/01/2010 - 10/31/2010

MCL (TCR), MONTHLY

Maximum Contaminant Level Violation

COLIFORM (TCR)

10/01/2010 - 10/31/2010

 

The City Of Bridgeport has taken the following actions to return to compliance with the Nebraska Safe Drinking Water Act:

 

The system was flushed and disinfected to solve the coliform and E. coli problem.

A water treatment facility is now online to help with the uranium issue.

 Additional Required Health Effects Language:

Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other potentially harmful bacteria may be present.  Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.    

E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, some of the elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems.

 Some people who drink water containing uranium in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer and kidney toxicity.

 A copy of this CCR may be viewed at the City of Bridgeport offices – 809 Main Street.